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Intuitive Eating — The Magic of Knowing

What would it be like to never again stress about what you eat or how to control your weight?  Imagine the release of energy, and the freedom and peace from knowing that this area of your life is handled.

That is exactly what intuitive eating is all about. Young children are great examples of intuitive eaters—they eat only when they are hungry, only what they like and want, and only the amount that they are hungry for in any particular moment.

How Intuitive Eating Can Change Your Life

What is the Practice of Intuitive Eating?

“Intuitive Eating” is simply the innate knowing of what, when and how much to eat for one’s individual nutritional needs. We are all born with this inner knowing. Several nutrition studies have demonstrated that when children are allowed to choose their food, they will choose a “balanced diet”–defined as nutritionally adequate for growth and health–over time, not necessarily in every meal or even in a day, but averaged out over several days to a couple of weeks.

Eating and Body Image Quiz

CLICK HERE to take the Eating and Body Image Quiz — Find out how you score!

Chances are you want to have healthy eating and self-care practices that are sustainable.  Yet, like many, you may not be clear on what steps you can take to create meaningful shifts so you experience freedom with food, peace with your body, and can move on to live your life’s dreams having your energy released from eating and weight worries.

Cambridge Who’s Who Names Barbara J. Birsinger, ThD, MPH, RD, Professional of the Year

Dr. Barbara Birsinger specializes in helping women restore intuitive eating, positive body image, and sustainable self-care practices.

SANTA ROSA, CA, May 5, 2011 /Management PR News/ –Barbara J. Birsinger, ThD, MPH, RD, Consultant and Owner of Energetics of Eating, has been named a Cambridge Who’s Who Professional of the Year in Nutrition and Dietetics. While inclusion in the Cambridge Who’s Who Registry is an honor, only a small selection of members in each discipline are chosen for this distinction.

12 TIPS for HOLIDAY EATING and HEALTH in BODY, MIND and SPIRIT

Restoring balance to eating and stress levels can be especially difficult during the holiday season.   Most people struggle during the holidays with too much to do, too much stress, too little time, and too much food.  Over the next few weeks I will post 12 tips on intuitive eating and self-care can help you navigate smoothly through the holidays feeling healthy in body, mind and spirit.

12 TIPS for HOLIDAY EATING and HEALTH in BODY, MIND and SPIRIT – Part II

As promised here are the next 4 tips of the 12 Tips for Holiday Eating and Health in Body, Mind and Spirit.

1.  Allow your favorite foods

and “normalize” them, as part of a well-rounded and diverse way of eating, so as to not feel afraid or desperate around certain foods.  Scarcity and deprivation (as in restricting or dieting or eating “diet” foods) lead to feelings of desperation and anxiety, which can lead to overeating later.  Practicing the “Eating from the Neck Down” exercise above helps you to trust your body when eating any kind of  food, and this can help you to feel more calm, secure, and well-taken care of—creating less of a need to overeat from symbolic hunger.

12 TIPS for HOLIDAY EATING and HEALTH in BODY, MIND and SPIRIT – Part III

Here are the last of my 12 Tips for Holiday Eating and Health in Body, Mind and Spirit. I do hope that you have found these useful. Enjoy the rest of this wonderful holiday season.

1.  Do a closet project.

Go through your closet and remove all of the clothes that are not current—that don’t fit, don’t feel comfortable, or are not currently in season.  Put them in storage, or give them away.  What good are they sitting in your closet?  Do you ever find that you talk down to yourself about your clothes that no longer feel good or fit you?  Do you ever feel as though you have a closet full of clothes and yet you can’t find anything to wear?  Remember, it is these kinds of thoughts that can lead to obsessing about food and weight and disordered eating behaviors later (a minute, an hour, a day, or a week later).